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tommyshphrd:

OH MY GOD 
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spencerlonewolf:

RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS ANNUAL #2Written by SCOTT LOBDELLArt by JONBOY MEYERCover by R.B. SILVA and WALDEN WONGOn sale DECEMBER 24 • 48 pg, FC, $4.99 US • RATED TRed Hood, Arsenal and Starfire face the one enemy they may not be able to defeat: the holidays!

spencerlonewolf:

RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS ANNUAL #2
Written by SCOTT LOBDELL
Art by JONBOY MEYER
Cover by R.B. SILVA and WALDEN WONG
On sale DECEMBER 24 • 48 pg, FC, $4.99 US • RATED T
Red Hood, Arsenal and Starfire face the one enemy they may not be able to defeat: the holidays!

cornflakepizza:

if you love yourself NEVER count how many comics you own and try to approximate how much money you’ve spent

punisherwarjournal:


Just a thug. Like I said.

The Punisher: In the Blood #1
Rick Remender + Roland Boschi
Jigsaw is known as the one really definitive Punisher villain. However, as a character, he has never really worked. By simple premise, the idea of the Punisher, whose entire basis lies in his use of lethality, having a recurring rogue gallery makes little sense. It’s the butt of several jokes: if the Punisher has a list of established villains chasing him, then something is going wrong with the story. Even so, for awhile in the 90s, when Frank was booming in popularity, there were a few repeating faces — and Billy Russo’s viciously scarred one was among them. However, he never really existed as a threat.
Billy was never really written as being especially dangerous, powerful or intelligent. He is always presented as the Punisher foe in media; toys, games, films all cater to this rivalry. But it’s without much canon evidence to back it. Jigsaw’s  storyarcs are petty and forgettable at best. Frank has never felt intimidated by Jigsaw; he often handles him with ease. Billy is even written to be openly afraid of Frank on several occasions, which is a fair response, but hardly presents a case for him as a worthy foe. He has never really had one big victory over Frank. He continuously fails and only really endures with a cockroach like determination — but often Frank actually lets him go, which is baffling as well as a bit sadistic.
Remender actually found a way to make Jigsaw work, but that was through his son, Henry. Jigsaw doesn’t intimidate Frank, but he intimidates Henry. Henry has that complicated relationship of abuse, scorn for his father mixed with affection that he cannot help. The concept looms over Remender’s arc from the time Henry’s heritage is exposed: Jigsaw has power over Henry, and since Frank also cares for the boy deeply (as Remender affirmed) that is where the real threat exists. That is the first time Jigsaw feels truly dangerous, and leaves a lasting impression where other arcs failed to register.

punisherwarjournal:

Just a thug. Like I said.

The Punisher: In the Blood #1

Rick Remender + Roland Boschi

Jigsaw is known as the one really definitive Punisher villain. However, as a character, he has never really worked. By simple premise, the idea of the Punisher, whose entire basis lies in his use of lethality, having a recurring rogue gallery makes little sense. It’s the butt of several jokes: if the Punisher has a list of established villains chasing him, then something is going wrong with the story. Even so, for awhile in the 90s, when Frank was booming in popularity, there were a few repeating faces — and Billy Russo’s viciously scarred one was among them. However, he never really existed as a threat.

Billy was never really written as being especially dangerous, powerful or intelligent. He is always presented as the Punisher foe in media; toys, games, films all cater to this rivalry. But it’s without much canon evidence to back it. Jigsaw’s  storyarcs are petty and forgettable at best. Frank has never felt intimidated by Jigsaw; he often handles him with ease. Billy is even written to be openly afraid of Frank on several occasions, which is a fair response, but hardly presents a case for him as a worthy foe. He has never really had one big victory over Frank. He continuously fails and only really endures with a cockroach like determination — but often Frank actually lets him go, which is baffling as well as a bit sadistic.

Remender actually found a way to make Jigsaw work, but that was through his son, Henry. Jigsaw doesn’t intimidate Frank, but he intimidates Henry. Henry has that complicated relationship of abuse, scorn for his father mixed with affection that he cannot help. The concept looms over Remender’s arc from the time Henry’s heritage is exposed: Jigsaw has power over Henry, and since Frank also cares for the boy deeply (as Remender affirmed) that is where the real threat exists. That is the first time Jigsaw feels truly dangerous, and leaves a lasting impression where other arcs failed to register.

plasticfarm:

The second THANOS AND DARKSEID: CARPOOL BUDDIES OF DOOM. Guest starring: Doctor Doom!

Written by Justin Jordan (who has a new issue of Green Lantern: New Guardians coming out this Wednesday and has a new series, Dead Body Road, coming out in December) and drawn by Rafer Roberts (who is currently making Plastic Farm and Nightmare the Rat comics).

You can read the first Thanos and Darkseid here.

itswalky:

Shortpacked!: Chex MIx
I see this comic and think “that’s why Hush is super awesome” but twentypercentcooler sees this comic and thinks “that’s why Hush is super dumb.”

itswalky:

Shortpacked!: Chex MIx

I see this comic and think “that’s why Hush is super awesome” but twentypercentcooler sees this comic and thinks “that’s why Hush is super dumb.”

kenihewa:

The Origin of Nightwing

kenihewa:

The Origin of Nightwing

(Source: comicartcommunity)

why-i-love-comics:

Rocket Raccoon #2 - “A Chasing Tale II”

written by Skottie Young
art by Skottie Young 

why-i-love-comics:

A-Babies Vs. X-Babies #1

written by Skottie Young
art by Gurihiru

iconuk01:

In the final battle, with the army of the Red Skull and his usurper Tiberius on one side, and Selene and the free Nova Romani on the other, Warlock considers a lethal approach, but knows his buddy Doug would want him to be a better being than that. It’s a nice inspiring moment.

But it’s the final pages I posted this thing for; After the eventual defeat of Red Skull and Tiberius, it’s time for the New Mutants to return hom and recover, though Doug’s condition appears permanent. Being X-Men, they have many options to consider, but it’s Warlock who takes matters into his own hands, and proceeds to rewrite Doug’s entire genetic code to return his best friend to normal, and in doing so absorbs all the pain that Doug would otherwise feel, which is perhaps the ultimate bro thing to do.

I suspect there was supposed to be something in those final panels of the bloodstream to suggest that there was more going on, perhaps a couple of black and gold platelets to hint at a more prominent TO presence in Doug’s body than before, but that colourists didn’t manage it.